One of the loudest buzzwords heard these days within the business computing environment is SECURITY. And the number one method to prevent a security breach is the use of multi-factor (MFA) or two-step authentication.

 

The most common practice in the MFA arena is to use SMS texting to receive an authentication code. When prompted, you enter the code into the field provided and voilà! The problem with this is that hackers are now SIM swapping or hijacking your mobile phone. When they’re successful, the hackers can request and receive a security code to access your account, lock you out of your own account, and wreak havoc with your life.

 

The best way around this is to use an authenticator app. Google has one, Microsoft has one, and there are popular third-party authenticator apps, such as Authy. They all work with any of your online accounts, but you should find one and use it!

 

As a Microsoft-centric technician, my preference is to use Microsoft Authenticator. It provides security codes for all Microsoft accounts either free and business, Google/Gmail, Reddit, Facebook, and so on. The easiest account to access with Authenticator is your Office 365 account – a balloon pops up on your mobile device and you simply tap it to authenticate.

 

When your devices are managed through Intune and Enterprise, Mobility + Security (EMS), then you have to have permission to use the app first. In my case, the Touch ID biometric thumb reader on my iPhone provides quick access to the Authenticator app itself, as well as access to any other Microsoft apps on the device.

 

It takes some getting used to, however getting hacked is not an option.

 

Scott Abbotts | https://resolute-it.com | https://office365techguy.com

Hand Shake Agreement
When an IT services company charges hourly for their work, they have no incentive to accomplish tasks in a timely or even competent manner. Nor are they compelled to innovate or formulate preventive measures. If it breaks, then cha-ching!

On the other hand, if an IT services company is paid to keep everything working, then it behooves them to remain proactive. If they don’t, then they’re not doing their prescribed job, which means dismissal and termination of the agreement = no $$$$. “You’re fired.”

These are the basic tenets of the managed IT services model. When a proactive and preventive agreement is in place, then it is in the mutual benefit of both parties that the Internet is up, the computers are running, data is safely in place, the workers are productive, and the company is compliant with regulatory mandates.

When all is up and running in a stable manner, then costs also become stable. The agreement between the IT services company and their client determines the expected monthly compensation amount. And the agreement defines the set of services provided on behalf of the client. It is understood by both parties that the same payment amount will transpire on a consistent basis, which means no surprises; the IT services company can rely upon payment and the client company can expect to pay the monthly remittance as an ongoing cost of doing business – for stable conditions.

And it’s not just about the network and the machines. The people using the network need ongoing support. They need to resolve problems that arise preventing them from accomplishing the tasks at hand. And they need improved skills to attain their long-term goals, so training is an integral component of the managed IT services support environment. One-on-one coaching is invaluable and providing a responsive helpdesk system is crucial to the holistic health of the system.

The managed services contract is nothing more than a simple agreement. Both parties pledge to perform for their mutual benefit.

Scott Abbotts | https://resolute-it.com | https://office365techguy.com


For many years, we’ve learned to save files to folders. And within folders, we’ve created subfolders as yet another location to store files. And then you might create a folder within that subfolder… The result can lead to a complicated collection of nested folders with files stored in disparate locations.

 

Then along came SharePoint where we learned a new way to sort documents – with metadata. Metadata hasn’t gone away at all, but I only see its best value when considering larger document libraries.

 

 

Now we have Microsoft Teams and its filing system! Because each channel within Teams has an associated folder in the Team’s SharePoint document library, we’re starting to consider yet another way of looking at file management. Perhaps we can think of a Teams channel as a folder?

 

 

The General folder for the General channel is seen from the RIT Finance SharePoint team site.

 

 

If we were to add a new channel to a team, then a new folder by that name would appear in addition to the General folder.

 

But now we have to talk about sharing files within Teams.

 

When a file is shared with a colleague while in a private chat, then the file is stored within the OneDrive repository belonging to the person who shared the file. In truth, OneDrive is actually a hidden SharePoint library, but that’s fodder for another conversation.

 

But when you share a file while in a channel’s group conversation, then the file becomes stored within the respective channel’s Files tab, or rather, the channel’s folder within the Team’s SharePoint document library.

 

If you’ve forgotten which channel’s folder contains the file you’re looking for, then you can go to the Files button in the left-hand rail to view and scroll through the collective list of files belonging to all teams and channels. Or you can search all files across all Teams’ channels from the Command bar at the top-center. This search tool is available at all times wherever you are within the Teams app. You can also sort using metadata within the Files view by clicking the column labels, such as Type, Name, Modified, and Location.